Loving the least of these

Have you ever faced a situation, and thought, “I don’t know what to do!!”?  You pray and seek out the counsel of the Holy Spirit, ready to obediently respond, if only you knew what that obedience looked like.  Sometimes we can feel like that even in the simple day-to-day details of life.  We want desperately to live a life of sacrifice, obedience and purpose as a response to the grace we’ve received from Christ.  But what does that actually mean?  How does one do so?

Our starting place for answering these questions must be in God’s word.  And even more specifically, we’ve got to understand God’s character and core values, and act accordingly.  So if you’re not sure what to do or how to respond, line up your decisions and behavior with Who God says He is.

For example, you can’t help but see God’s care and concern for the least of these in society – the orphans, widows and aliens.  Caring for the least of these isn’t a mandate to a select few in society.  It isn’t the job of a government or social service agency.  It is a command that we all should heed, and it’s even used as a measuring stick for the reality and authenticity of our faith.

    Religion that God our Father accepts as pure and faultless is this: to look after orphans and widows in their distress and to keep oneself from being polluted by the world.  James 1:27

We are all called to care for orphans.  For some of us, that means growing our family through adoption.  For others, it may mean supporting others financially who are going through the adoption process themselves. Our friends from Florida, Eric and Jenny Monier, are one such family in the process of adoption. They are adopting Daniel from Eastern Europe. Daniel will be incredibly blessed to be raised by the Monier family. Eric is a pastor at a church, Jenny homeschools her other children, and Daniel’s three brothers excitedly wait for their new brother.

Adoption is not an inexpensive venture. The costs and expenses are significant. But so too is the precious life of a child. And Daniel who has Down Syndrome is extra special. Children with special needs, like Daniel, are typically committed to mental institutions for life at the age of four. Because the Monier family has committed to his adoption, he has been allowed to temporarily stay at his current baby orphanage. However, his future health and welfare is contingent on him coming home quickly to be loved by a family. Just today a little boy, not all that different from Daniel, passed away waiting for his forever family.

Jenny and Eric Monier are currently raising the funds for their adoption and have a wonderful giveaway for an Amazon Kindle. By donating to their adoption funds, you earn entries into the April 25th drawing for a brand-new Kindle. Before you stop reading, and think, “money is really tight right now, otherwise I’d help”, take a minute to think about your last 24 hours. What money did you spend? And on what? It seems that even when money is tight, we still manage to buy a coffee on the way to work, eat out for lunch, or pickup a new scarf at the store.

Take just a minute to head over to Jenny’s blog and read about this giveaway. You can play a role in helping Daniel have a chance at life with a family. If you rejoice in your own adoption as a child of God, shouldn’t you consider helping with another adoption of someone equally as deserving?  And if you’re interested in pursuing adoption of special children like Daniel, be sure to check out Reece’s Rainbow Adoption Ministry – you just might find your next son or daughter and fall in love!

My prayer for myself, and each one of you, is that we would be faithful to live out the truths of Micah 6:8.

    He has shown you, O mortal, what is good.
    And what does the LORD require of you?
    To act justly and to love mercy
    and to walk humbly with your God.
  • Wow….thank you so much for writing such a poignant blog entry and advocating for our little man. Eric and I are so grateful to have been a part of your family’s life (even if only for 2 weeks); to be able to really see what adoption is like. Two words seem inadequate to express my gratitude.