In the belly of a whale

Ever felt far from God – either by life’s circumstances or your own choosing?  You might relate then with Jonah and the people of Nineveh.  While Jonah always makes a fascinating Sunday School lesson for kids, it also offers us a some great insights into God and His character.  No matter who you are, what you’ve done, and where you are – you’re never too far gone for God.  He pursues you, loves you, forgives you and listens when you pray.  If God had mercy on the evil, cruel people of Nineveh, He will look upon you too with mercy.

Turn up on the volume, gather the kids, and enjoy this great rendition of Newboys‘ “In the belly of a whale”.  (Warning – if your kids are anything like mine, they’ll want to listen and watch the video again, and again, and again…)

And then take a look below at a few key verses from Jonah.  Are you far from Him right now?  Or do you know someone who is?  How might you share these truths with them?

When we are far from Him:

  • God pursues us.

But Jonah ran away from the LORD and headed for Tarshish. He went down to Joppa, where he found a ship bound for that port. After paying the fare, he went aboard and sailed for Tarshish to flee from the LORD. Then the LORD sent a great wind on the sea, and such a violent storm arose that the ship threatened to break up. Jonah 1:3-4

  • God loves and forgives us.

And should I not have concern for the great city of Nineveh, in which there are more than a hundred and twenty thousand people who cannot tell their right hand from their left—and also many animals? Jonah 4:11

When God saw what they did and how they turned from their evil ways, he relented and did not bring on them the destruction he had threatened. Jonah 3:10

  • We can (and should!) still pray.

From inside the fish Jonah prayed to the LORD his God. Jonah 2:1

  • Lindsay

    I’m doing Priscilla Shirer’s study on Jonah right now, and I’m blown away by some of the stuff I missed hearing that story as a child. Her main point is to learn to view distractions as divine opportunities instead. I like that!