Secrets of the Super Bowl

This post was originally published on February 2, 2011 (hence the Super Bowl XLV logo!).  I am re-publishing it today as we prepare for Super Bowl 2012.   Also, visit Sojourners for an excellent article, “Super Bowl XLVI: Real Battles off the Field.


Super Bowl weekend is quickly upon us.  Parties are being planned.  Snacks and drinks are being bought.  And the anticipation builds.  Which team will prevail?  What favorite commercials will be talked about the next day?

But amidst all the conversations, planning, and shopping – one topic will go largely unmentioned – sex trafficking.

What does sex trafficking have to do with the Super Bowl?  Plenty.

Sex trafficking of under-age girls spikes every year prior to the Super Bowl, and it isn’t just a coincidence.  The demand for sex-for-sale will increase dramatically this weekend, and traffickers are ready to respond by supplying victims of the sex trade on the streets of Dallas.  The under-age sex industry is a multi-million dollar industry in the US, and according to the TX Attorney General, “The Super Bowl is one of the biggest human trafficking events in the United States.”

To many of you this is shocking.  So shocking in fact, that you want to forget what you just read.  But as shocking and disturbing as it is, it is also true.  While we have the luxury to sit safely in our homes, shocked and saddened by this news, young girls right now are being victimized and trafficked.  How can you help?

Spread the word.  Stop the silence.  Knowledge is power.  Elie Wiesel, a survivor of the Nazi Death Camps, once said, “to remain silent and indifferent is the greatest sin of all.”  Don’t remain silent.  Share this post.  Take a stand.  Visit Operation Broken Silence to learn how you can get involved.

Do something, and do it now – because the few minutes you take to spread the word might just make a difference for one girl – a girl just like your daughter, your niece, your cousin, your granddaughter, your neighbor.

  • idgaf

    It’s not just girls who are trafficked for sex.

    • Good comment, the stats seem to be about a 70/30 split worldwide, but I’m not certain of how that ends up in the US.

    • Very true – thanks for that comment.  I wonder what the prevalence of trafficked boys/men is during Super Bowl weekend.